Cases in the Philippines

How Japanese Encephalitis Affects People and How to Prevent It

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My daughter Zoe got injected with a vaccine for prevention of Japanese encephalitis. The price for one shot is P3000. I researched about the disease and I was convinced that my kids should get the vaccine to prevent it. Below is my article about the Japanese encephalitis, please continue reading to know the symptoms and treatment of Japanese encephalitis.

Zoe, baby Zoe, little girl, Zofia Zoe got injected
Zoe visiting her pedia

Zoe, baby Zoe, little girl, Zofia Zoe got injected, little girl smiling after vaccine
still smiling :)

Even the Team Kramer also got injected

Japanese encephalitis (JE) is a mosquito-borne viral infection, which happens mainly in rural areas of Asia. Humans acquire the illness when bitten by a Culex-species mosquito carrying the virus. However, the good thing is that it cannot be transmitted from person to person. The risk is fairly low among travelers; which may be higher among those living in areas where the disease is common, or for those traveling there for a longer period of time.



Humans are not only affected by the virus. Mosquitoes can have pigs and horses infected too. Wild birds are natural hosts of the disease, where mosquitoes serve as its transmitters. When the carriers feed on newly-infected animals, they can take up the virus and can go on to infect other animals and humans.

Signs and Symptoms of JE


An individual with JE will probably experience no symptoms at all, but should there be symptoms, they will likely appear five to fifteen days after being infected. A person with a mild infection can have only fever and headache, but in more serious cases, symptoms may develop quickly.

A headache, high fever, stiff neck, nausea, vomiting, tremors, and spastic paralysis may be experienced. Signs of modified mental status include disorientation, stupor, and coma. Children can also experience convulsions. Testicles can also be swollen.

If the brain is involved, it may result in neurological defects, such as uncontrollable emotions, weakness on one side of the body, and deafness.

Survival varies depending on the condition of the patient, and children post more risks.

Diagnosis


To diagnose the disease, the doctor takes into account the symptoms, where the patient lives, and the places they have visited. This can help determine the probability of acquiring JE.

If the doctor finds an infection, the patient should undergo tests such as magnetic resonance image (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) scan of the brain.

A spinal tap or lumbar puncture may be used to draw fluid from the spine. The results will show what virus is causing the infection.

JE Cases in the Philippines


The first case of the disease in the country was way back in 1982 in Nueva Ecija. Information from DOH Epidemiology Bureau disclosed that for 2016, a report shows around 875 acute meningitis-encephalitis suspected cases were 14% laboratory-confirmed for JE.

Currently, the highest number of confirmed cases was recorded in Nueva Ecija, Tarlac and Pampanga, followed by Cagayan, Nueva Viscaya and Isabela; and Compostela Valley, Davao Oriental and Davao del Sur.

Treatment

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Japanese encephalitis has no treatment or cure, but a safe and effective JE-chimeric vaccine can prevent infection. It was first licensed in the Philippines in 2013. The vaccine is approved for use for children as young as nine months and adults, with high immunogenicity rates.

The JE-chimeric vaccine is highly advised for those traveling to areas where the disease is endemic, for those on short-term trips lasting few weeks only, for those visiting areas where there is an outbreak, and for those participating in outdoor activities.

Reference:

http://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/wps/wcm/connect/public+content/sa+health+internet/health+topics/health+conditions+prevention+and+treatment/infectious+diseases/japanese+encephalitis
http://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/wps/wcm/connect/public+content/sa+health+internet/health+topics/health+conditions+prevention+and+treatment/infectious+diseases/japanese+encephalitis
http://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/wps/wcm/connect/public+content/sa+health+internet/health+topics/health+conditions+prevention+and+treatment/infectious+diseases/japanese+encephalitis

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2 comments

  1. hello po! from what hospital did your daughter get the vaccine? hoping for your response.

    ReplyDelete
  2. To all who's asking my kids pedia.. she's Dra. Jen Villon of VT Maternity Marikina City.

    ReplyDelete